Kaddish

For thousands of years, our Holy Torah has commanded Jews, and provided us with opportunities to elevate the souls of our deceased. How? One way is to recite the Kaddish Prayer. This prayer does not contain any mention of death or despair. Rather, this prayer focuses on ascribing greatness and faith in our creator, at a time when our loved one passes into the next world.

Moreover, our holy Torah tells us that each time the prayer is recited, our loved ones soul goes up a level in the next world; a tremendous merit for our loved ones

Kaddish is recited by the (male) children of the deceased. If a deceased has no children or the child is incapable of reciting Kaddish, someone else, preferably a relative should assume the task. If this is not feasible, then another person can be hired to recite Kaddish.

Kaddish needs to be said in the presence of a Minyan, ten adult men (over age thirteen) at prescribed times during the prayer services, or after torah is learned.

Specifically, the Kaddish is recited every day for the first eleven months after the persons passing; during each of the three prayer services, Shacharit, Mincha and Maariv.

Who Recites Kaddish?

Kaddish is recited by the (male) children of the deceased. If the deceased has no children or the child of the deceased is incapable of reciting Kaddish, someone else, preferably a relative should assume the task. If this is not feasible, then another person can be hired to recite Kaddish.

When to Recite Kaddish

Kaddish needs to be said in the presence of a Minyan, ten adult men (over age thirteen) at prescribed times during the prayer services, or after torah is learned.

Specifically, the Kaddish is recited every day for the first eleven months after a parent’s passing; during each of the three prayer services. For others, it is one month.

Per the Kaballah, part of the oral Torah, it is also beneficial if the mourner leads the daily services, because this enables him to add “extra kaddishes†to his loved ones “merit ledger.†When leading the prayer service services, the total Kaddishim said would be sixteen. (However, while it is not forbidden, many have the custom that a mourner should not lead the services on the Sabbath and Holidays. – Rema 376:4 towards the end)

Disclaimer

Neither the articles nor videos are meant to be halachic rulings, so please contact a posek regarding your situation. Our website is intended to be a helpful guide, but for everything contained in the articles or videos, or to the extent that we inadvertantly made a mistake on one of the articles or videos, please contact your local Orthodox Rabbi regarding it.

Disclaimer

The articles are not meant to be halachic rulings, so please contact a posek regarding your situation. Our website is intended to be a helpful guide, but for everything contained in the articles, or to the extent that we inadvertantly made a mistake on one of the articles, please contact your local Orthodox Rabbi regarding it.